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 Chikurachki Volcano, Russia, Volcano photo
Chikurachki Volcano, Russia

The NW slopes of Chikurachki, the highest volcano on Paramushir Island, rise above the Sea of Okhotsk.

Oxidized scoria covering the upper part of the cone give it a distinctive red color.

The Tatarinov group of six volcanic centers is located immediately to the south of Chikurachki, forming the ridge on the right horizon.

In contrast to the frequently active Chikurachki, the Tatarinov volcanoes are extensively modified by erosion and have a more complex structure.

Chikurachki, the highest volcano on Paramushir Island in the northern Kuriles, is actually a relatively small cone constructed on a high Pleistocene volcanic edifice.

Oxidized basaltic-to-andesitic scoria deposits covering the upper part of the young cone give it a distinctive red color.

Frequent basaltic plinian eruptions have occurred from Chikurachki during the Holocene.

Lava flows from 1816-m-high Chikurachki reached the sea and form capes on the NW coast; several young lava flows also emerge from beneath the scoria blanket on the eastern flank.

The Tatarinov group of six volcanic centers is located immediately to the south of Chikurachki.

In contrast to the frequently active Chikurachki, the Tatarinov volcanoes are extensively modified by erosion and have a more complex structure.

Tephrochronology gives evidence of only one eruption in historical time from Tatarinov, although its southern cone contains a sulfur-encrusted crater with fumaroles that were active along the margin of a crater lake until 1959.

PHOTO SOURCE: Yoshihiro Ishizuka, 2000 (Hokkaido University), courtesy of the Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, used with permission.



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This page was last modified 23-FEB-10
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